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  • Writer's pictureRenee Matsalla

Are You Using Product Management Principles To Scale? Complete This Quiz to Find Out!

Updated: Jun 5

Whenever we start a presentation to folks who are new to the Product Management method, we ask a variation of the same question: 


What do Google, Amazon, Calendly, Arc’teryx, Nvidia, Jobber, Benevity, and thousands more successful innovative companies have in common? 


The answer is Product Management. 


Folks are always surprised to learn that these different but successful companies use Product Management education and principles to scale, innovate, and succeed. People are especially surprised because most people have never even heard of a Product Manager. 


How can all of these companies use Product Management education and principles as a backbone of their strategy and no one has heard of it?!  


Is Product Management education the best kept secret in product development?!  


Perhaps!  


What is this method and why is it so successful?  


It’s a method that flips traditional product development on its head. It’s a method that acknowledges that we don’t know the right solution right away. It acknowledges that we need to experiment, learn, and try new things to find the right market and the right solution to a problem. It doesn't assume that we know all the “requirements” upfront.  


Where UX uses prototyping to find the right usability, we use prototyping and experimentation to test every risk around a new product, including the value, viability, usability, feasibility, and morality of a product. We get clear on a problem instead of a solution. We imagine what the world will look like when the problem is solved then try different ways of solving this problem is incremental ways.  

what makes a great product manager

What do Product Management education and principles look like in action? 


We often tell people that living in Product Management practices is like fire: it’s tough to describe, but once you’ve experienced it you will never forget it.  

What are some of the things you may experience that indicate that you are following the Product Management method? If you and your team has experienced any of the below, you are likely using Product Management principles! 


  1. You feel joy when creating products. 

  2. You feel less pressure to hit deadlines that are made up pretending we know what’s required to solve a problem. 

  3. You are laughing and having fun in meetings. 

  4. You are comfortable throwing away ideas. 

  5. You are comfortable coming up with many ideas instead of trying to perfect one. 

  6. You all feel a drive to solve a problem instead of hit a deadline. 

  7. You are driven by passion and empathy over fear. 

  8. Failures are seen as learnings and we think “wow, glad we found this out now instead of months down the road!” 

  9. There is no more fighting between teams, instead we all are on the same team solving for our users and our organization. 

  10. Timelines are forecasts and used to guide decision making, not to control. 

  11. Product launches are less hectic and things roll out relatively smoothly. 

  12. We know a product is worth building before we commit to a solution. 

  13. Anyone can speak up to voice risks and ideas.  

  14. You know which of your products is creating the most value for your business. 

  15. You rarely over-develop products, instead building the minimum and growing from there.  


Have you answered yes to any of the above?? Then you are likely using your Product Management method to develop products!  


Answered no? Don’t worry! Product Management can be learned and implemented easily. In fact, we’ve seen teams and companies make significant moves to the product management method in a single afternoon of collaboration.  


Unlock your path to product greatness with Tacit Edge! Our tailor-made product management training & certification programs are designed to elevate your skills and propel you toward success.


Accelerate Your Product Management Pathway

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